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Welcome to iBrattleboro!

Welcome to iBrattleboro!
It's a local news source by and for the people of Brattleboro, Vermont, published continually. You can get involved in this experiment in citizen journalism by submitting meeting results, news, events, stories, reviews, how-to's, recipes, places to go, things to do, or anything else important to Brattleboro. Or, just drop by to see what others have contributed.

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Ye Olde iBrattleboro Archive

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Search the first decade
of iBrattleboro archives
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Feb 20, 2003 to Feb 6, 2013

History


History section

The Brattleboro Historical Society Oral History Project presents Bill Holiday's Interview with Peter Gould

In 1969 Peter Gould was, "tired of the Vietnam War, [and] angry at my county," as he fled the disconsolate urban chaos in search of an alternative. He found it in at Packer Corners, in Guilford, Vermont and spent the next 9 years at the farm.

In June of 2016 Peter sat with Brattleboro educator and historian Bill Holiday to recount those times in Peter's personal narrative and the narrative of a remarkable place that lives on, nearly 50 years later.

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Not as Nature Intended - The Vogue of Smooth Pudenda

Warning! This article contains adult related content. Viewer discretion is advised.

It might have been lice and crabs that first prompted men and women to deforest their pubic hairs. It was much easier to remove the offending critters by “deforestation” than to try pick the nits off through a tangle of curly hair. If you look at paintings and sculptures of nude men and women over time, however, curiously, they often have no genital hair. Historically, I haven’t found an explanation for this. Nevertheless, our recorded history of pubic hair removal dates back to antiquity. Our forebears of civilizations in Egyptian, Greek and Roman societies employed pubic hair removal, but it was more likely on a courtesan level.

It was the wealthy, upperclasses and monarchal courts who would have the free time to cosset themselves in the vogue and erotica of smooth pudenda. It was the poor, incoherent, uneducated masses who missed out on the fun erotica of the times. Perhaps, they devised their own?

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The BHS Oral History Podcast: Bill Holiday's Year 2000 Interview with Andy Natowich

In 2000, BHS trustee and former head ball coach of the BUHS football team, Bill Holiday, interviewed venerated Brattleboro sports legend Andy Natowich.

The BHS Podcast is proud to present that interview, in its entirety, for the first time.

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1879 Advertisement - The Self-Organist

This is an ad from the Phoenix here in Brattleboro in June of 1879. I include it here for all of you with dirty minds.

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This Week in Brattleboro History Podcast - Brattleboro Historian Dick Mitchell

Dick Mitchell was an active Trustee of the Brattleboro Historical Society. He was born in Brattleboro in 1917 and passed away in 1990. What follows are memories of his growing up in the 1920's...

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Remembering the U.S.S. Liberty

The story of the Liberty is not well known. On the surface, it doesn’t make sense at all.

Yet it happened, and Lyndon Johnson covered it up.

Read what Phil Giraldi says about it:

“Last Wednesday at noon at Arlington National Cemetery I attended the annual commemorative gathering of the survivors and friends of the U.S.S. Liberty. The moving service included the ringing of a ship’s bell for each one of the thirty-four American sailors, Marines and civilians that were killed in the deliberate Israeli attack that sought to sink the intelligence gathering ship and kill all its crew.

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The Brattleboro Historical Society Presents: This Week in Brattleboro History Podcast - 1952, The First Graduating Class at BUHS

In 1952 the first class at the new million dollar high school graduated. Here's the story...

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1860 Advertisement - James Fisk, Jr., Auctioneer

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BHS Podcast 50 - This Week in Brattleboro History - Brattleboro Sports Legend Diedrich Stolte

Next Friday evening the Diedrich Stolte Memorial Cup, the most prestigious athletic award
presented at BUHS graduation, will be awarded to a graduating senior. Here's the story of the man behind the
award...

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June 1882 Advertisement - Scott Dunklee

Scott Dunklee has exactly what you need, if what you need is a mowing machine, wagon, organ, horse, or sewing machine. This ad was in the Phoenix in June of 1882.

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The Brattleboro Historical Society Presents: This Week in Brattleboro History Podcast - Fats Waller & Estey Organs

Fats Waller slams it down with Attila Zoller and other jazz luminaries on his Estey organ, from Brattleboro!

In 1927 famous jazz musician and composer Fats Waller recorded the first organ jazz records using a modified Estey Pipe Organ from Brattleboro. This is the story of Fats Waller, the Estey Organ and Brattleboro...

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May 1888 Advertisement - Prof. Bristol's Equescurriculum

From a May 1888 issue of The Phoenix, following up on our earlier exploration of this traveling show.

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The Brattleboro Historical Society Presents: This Week in Brattleboro History Podcast - What for Art Thou, School?

It was 103 years ago this week that the largest headline in the Brattleboro Daily Reformer asked, “What Is A School For?” In 1913, the Vermont Legislature created a Commission to examine the state of public education in the Green Mountains. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching evaluated the Vermont school system and gave recommendations intended to improve education. Today’s BAMS students read a summary of the ancient report and reacted. Here’s the story.

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May 1886 Advertisement - The Pivot Corset

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Equescurriculum

1888:

Prof. Bristol’s “Equescuriculum” will exhibit at the town hall May 24-26.

http://www.sheaff-ephemera.com/list/letterheads/prof-d-m-bristols-equesc...

http://www.circushistory.org/Olympians/OlympiansB2.htm gives us...

"BRISTOL, CLIFFORD. Son of D. M. Bristol. Agent, VanAmburgh’s, 1847.

BRISTOL, DE LOSS M. (d. May 11, 1926) Father of Clifford Bristol. Prof. Bristol’s Equescurriculum (horses and mules), 1885-91; Prescott’s Great Eastern, 1896. Died at home of his son, Exeter, age 78."

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Shocking Story

1886:

Dr. Frederick M. Palmer, postmaster in 1846 who created the Brattleboro provisional stamp, jumps to his death from a Portland steamer out of Boston holding his 4-year-old grandson.

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The Brattleboro Historical Society Presents: This Week in Brattleboro History Podcast - WWI Parade

It was 97 years ago this week that Brattleboro celebrated the return of her World War I soldiers, sailors and nurses with a parade up and down Main Street. An estimated 8,000 spectators watched 50 local organizations join together to honor the 470 men and women who served during the “War to end all Wars”. Here's the story...

 

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A Playground for Empire: Historical Perspectives on Cuba and the USA

The Friends of Brooks Memorial Library invite the public to attend a free presentation by Tim Weed on Sunday, May 8 at 3:30 in the Library. The presentation is titled, "A Playground for Empire: Historical Perspectives on Cuba and the USA. Tim Weed has made many trips to Cuba, and will discuss past and current changes in Cuba and US relations.  

Weed is an award-winning author, outdoorsman, independent explorer and a founding director of the National Geographic Student Expeditions. This program is made possible through the Vermont Humanities Speakers Bureau.

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The Brattleboro Historical Society Presents: This Week in Brattleboro History Podcast - Indentured Servants

It was 150 years ago this week that Brattleboro’s Overseer of the Poor signed an Indentured Service contract with a farmer in Dover for the services of a ten year old boy named Robert Drake. That’s right! In 1866, one year after the Civil War ended, and 4 months after the United States Congress abolished slavery, a ten year old boy from Brattleboro was made an indentured servant until he reached his 21st birthday. Here's the story...

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April 1886 Advertisement: Thorn's Hop & Burdock Tonic

Here’s an advertisement for a useful item, made right here in Brattleboro. It’s Thorn’s Hop & Burdock Tonic, which is good for treating a range of ailments. Thorn made and sold his popular tonic for quite a few years in the late 1800's with great success.

This ad appeared in the Vermont Phoenix in the spring of 1886.

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