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Welcome to iBrattleboro!
It's a local news source by and for the people of Brattleboro, Vermont, published continually. You can get involved in this experiment in citizen journalism by submitting meeting results, news, events, stories, reviews, how-to's, recipes, places to go, things to do, or anything else important to Brattleboro. Or, just drop by to see what others have contributed.

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Feb 20, 2003 to Feb 6, 2013

History


History section

Booker T. Washington's Pencil

From today's Phoenix, December 15, 1899:

"Before the appearance of Booker T. Washington in the Auditorium a Brattleboro girl read that he always carried a lead pencil in his right hand when delivering an address. When he came up to the stage she looked for the pencil, and there it was.

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The Holiday Trade - A Look Among The Dealers, 1875

Digging through the old newspapers today, I found an interesting story describing the holiday items for sale at some of the stores downtown in 1875 during a period of economic hard times for many people.

The article provides quite a few extended details about the stores and items for sale, so I thought I'd share it. Set your iBrattleboro time machine for early December, 1875, and let's go shopping in downtown Brattleboro.

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1984: High Street Runaway Truck and Song

Today is the 30th anniversary of the runaway truck down the High Street hill, December 8, 1984. It was a busy shopping Saturday in Brattleboro. Margaret MacArthur's song, "Stephen Johnson" tells the story. It's available online at the VermontFolklifeCenter website.

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The Simple Recipe For Town Government - Village of Brattleboro Incorporated

In today’s paper, a Phoenix from 1858, a notice appeared requesting everyone to attend the village meeting next week in order to vote on incorporation of the village of Brattleboro.

Along side the notice was the full text of the state act authorizing incorporation. It describes the boundaries of the town, then outlines how the town is to be organized. I found it interesting to look back at our origins, so to speak, to see what we felt was the bare minimum required to operate Brattleboro on day one of incorporation.

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Documentary Film On Brattleboro Red Cross Nurse In France 1914-1918 To Be Shown By Historical Society

An American Nurse At War is the title of a documentary film to be shown on Sunday, November 9, 2014, at 2:30 pm for the annual meeting and program of the Brattleboro Historical Society at the Brattleboro History Center located in the Masonic Center building at 196 Main Street, Brattleboro.

The film chronicles the experience of Marion McCune Rice of Brattleboro who went to France one hundred years ago to care for injured soldiers during World War I. Rice was born in Brattleboro in 1882 and graduated from Brattleboro High School in 1900 before attending Smith College and nursing school at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. She was the sister of Howard Crosby Rice, longtime publisher of the Brattleboro Reformer, and spent summers at her home on Chestnut Hill.

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Peacock Alley Plumage Flies in 1859 Fight

While collecting historical notes from old papers, I occasionally come across stories that are a bit too long to condense for the This Day In History feature, but are fun nonetheless. This morning provides a fine axample with a story of a fight between two well-to-do women in town, in 1859.

It jumped out at me for a few reasons. One was the colorful reporting and choice of words to describe the fight in great detail. Another was that it was really quite a brawl if this description is correct. Imagine two of our most notable women going at it like this today. Charges would be pressed!

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150 Years Ago (1864 10/14)

Derby, Oct. 14, 1864.

Sister Abiah,- 

I have hired the Skinner House for one year and shall come after you Monday and stay all night so as to pack up and get an early start Tuesday. Father will come Tuesday for you and the children. Have Father Mansur come and help load Tuesday. Rec'd you letter last night.

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Let's Go To Valley Fair, 1893

For many decades, Brattleboro was home to the annual Valley Fair at this time of year. It was a two day, town-wide celebration of livestock, farming, craftsmanship, sport, and entertainment. Brattleboro literally shut down so that everyone could participate. Imagine the Stroll merged with the Guilford Fair, on steroids.

The newspapers would hype the event for months, giving details of various fair committees and their decisions. After the fair, they would run multi-page accounts with full details, and pages with lists of every winner of every competition - from best pumpkin pie to the cow that can produce the most milk.

Let’s go to Valley Fair, 1893!  I’ve combed through the reports to recreate a visit for us.

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150 Years Ago (1864 9/27)

(Post marked Martinsburg, W. Va. Oct. 1, 1864)

 6th Vt. Vols. Spt. 27, 1864.

Madam -

 It is with very sad heart that I inform you of the death of your husband. He was killed in action Sept. 19th, at the battle of Winchester during the last charge made by our Regt; A canister shot passing through his breast. His last words were, “I am a dead man.” We were in a great hurry at the time and I did not see him fall and did not learn of it until after the excitement was over. His things were all lost much to my sorrow.

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150 Years Ago (1864 9/19)

The Battle of Winchester (aka The Battle of Opequan Creek) 9/19/1864

Blake, Charles, credited to, Charleston, VT, age 43, substitute - enlisted 8/27/63, mustered in 8/27/63, Private, Co. D, 6th Vermont Volunteer infantry, killed in action, Winchester, 9/19/64

http://www.ranger95.com/civil_war_us/vermont/infantry/rosters/6th_inf_rg...

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=26401093

Mansur, Zophar Mack, credited to, Charleston, VT, age 19, enlisted 8/11/62, mustered in 9/1/62, Corporal, Co. K, 10th Vermont Volunteer infantry, wounded, Winchester, 9/19/64, discharged because of wounds 8/31/65

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150 Years Ago (1864 9/18)

Clifton Farm, Va.

Sept. 18th, 1864.

Dearest Wife,

The mail has come in rather unexpectedly, and will soon go out again. The mail that has arrived has not been distributed, so I know not whether there are any letters from you or not. I got one Thursday. I have nothing new to write.

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1860: The Little Fairy, Dollie Dutton

1860: The little fairy, Dollie Dutton, finished her series of entertainments to the inhabitants of Brattleboro in the Town Hall on Monday evening. While she herself os but nine years old, measuring 29 inches in height and weighing 15 pounds, she was assisted and sustained by two other persons, upon whose births the reverse ends of a powerful magnifying glass had seemed to smile in respective proportions.

Link to more info.

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150 Years Ago (1864 9/15)

Clifton Farm, Va.

Sept. 15th, 1864.

Dearest Abiah,

Went on picket Monday. Left a letter to be sent out that night, as there was a man going out, but came in and still find it here. It was not sent by some mistake, so now will let it go for what it is worth, and give you a new addition. We see no signs of moving, but we never know what the day may bring forth. We went on picket Monday, as I said before. On Tuesday our division were taken out on a scout towards Winchester. They went out about five miles and came back at some time in the night between 10 and 11.

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150 Years Ago (1864 9/12)

Clifton Farm, Va.

Sept. 12th, 1864. 

Dearest Abiah,-

Here we are yet, only our regiment has been moved down nearer the river and are doing picket duty by themselves. Came here Saturday. Saw Zopher just before we came; the same morning.

Perhaps it will do to talk a little about that commission. I have not wanted to say much about it heretofore, but it is probably not very far off. I received a note from Major Foster's office with regard to the chances of three of us. James Tinkham Capt. There were then ten that preceded him and 21 ahead of me and W. S. Myers he was second Lieut. There were 43 preceding him.

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150 Years Ago (1864 9/9)

Clifton Farm, Va. Sept. 9th, 1864.

Dear Cousin:-

Here I am, just about 1 ½ miles north of Berryville, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. I promised to write to you when in Washington, but have had so much to do that until within the past two weeks have had time to write to anyone, except my wife. I will give you a history of our movements since joining the regiment. Passed the Casey Board in Washington as first Lieut. for colored troops June 12th, went to Camp Distribution June 14th, drew arms and equipment that night (mine had been turned over at Brattleboro) next morning took a transport for Bermuda Hundred, reached there the third day after leaving Alexander. We went to City Point and the 6th Army Corps had just crossed the Potomac and were in front of Petersburgh. Went up there and reported June 20th for the places I shall mention. I will refer you to Leslie's Illustrated Paper for Sept. 10th.

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