"Each genius differs only from the mass in that he has found freedom for his greatness." - Robert Henri

User login

Today In Local History

1840:

150 Mahogany Looking Glasses, of 15 sizes, constituting the best assortment ever offered in this State, received direct from the Manufacturer and shall be sold Low, and the Store of Birge & Dickinson.

1840:

At Brattleboro East Village, on the 6th of May inst. a council of Baptist Ministers assembled, and gave the right hand of fellowship to a newly constituted Church of the same order; 88 members, 48 of whom were added by Baptism since the first of March last, being the first Baptist Church established in this town.

1858:

On Monday snow fell in Whitingham and Readsboro, while it hailed in this village and vicinity. “Winter lingering in the lap of Spring!” What business has the old fellow there?

1858:

Fisk’s Annual Spring Exhibition is to take place this Friday afternoon. The travelling mercantile establishment of James Fisk, Jr. is well known throughout New England, This concern has nine wagons all handsome and convenient, but one of which is ornamented in the most florid style. It employs nineteen horses and thirteen men.

1862:

Cheapest and Pleasantest Route From Brattleboro to New York. The Steamer Granite State, (1000 Tons Burthen,) Capt. J. H. King Will leave Hartford for New York, every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at 3 1/2 o’clock. Cabin Fare - $1.50; Second Class - $1.00. Purchase R.R. Tickets to Hartford only. Passengers leaving Brattleboro by 9:00 A.M. Train, have ample time to connect.

1862:

Ossian E. Dodge. — This irresistible, irrepressible, inexhaustible and incomparable wag, harmonist and vocalist is working his way slowly up the Connecticut, and will give one of his rare and select Musical and Literary Entertainments in the Town Hall, Tuesday, May 27th, on which occasion he is to be assisted by the eminent balladist Wm. Hayward and the veteran vocalist Bernard Covert author of “The Sword of Bunker Hill,” (which he will sing, and many other popular pieces.

1863:

Commodore Theodore P. Greene, educated in Brattleboro, ordered to command the Shenendoah, then detached and ordered to command the Santiago de Cuba, per sloop Ticonderoga.

1874:

The store of A. J. Simonds, lately closed out, is undergoing repairs, and it is rumored that he will resume the grocery business on the cash system.

1874:

The smelling committee is abroad. Beware!

1874:

Listers report Brattleboro has 327 firemen.

1874:

It isn’t often that a stylish young horse could be depended on to run at a lively gait, with a handsome buggy, but without a driver, from Centerville down Green street to Main street and then through Main street and up the hill to his home on High street, winding up with a few turns among the apple trees in the garden, without so much as a scratch on the buggy, or injury to himself or harness, but we know of an animal that successfully accomplished this feat last Monday morning.

1885:

The Brattleboro consignment of revised Bibles did not arrive until this morning. There is no special demand for the books and the booksellers expect slow sales.

1885:

A handsome new safe was put in the vault of the Vermont savings bank on Thursday to hold valuable papers.

1885:

Mr. Bingham offered to drill a company of not less than 100 High and Grammar school boys to take part in the Memorial day services, but a majority of the boys voted against participating. We are sorry for this.

1891:

It is now announced that Barnum’s circus will exhibit in Brattleboro in July, the advance agent having been here this week to make arrangements.

1891:

The Western aqueduct association are putting large new pipes on Grove street.

1891:

The Kickapoo Indian Medicine company’s performances at the town hall are attracting large crowds, and interesting programs of entertainment are presented.

1891:

Thus far this season F. A. Hubbard has sold 15 Columbia bicycles, all of the safety pattern.

1891:

George W. Fuller found on the engine house at the Estey shops on Monday an icicle nine and one-fourth inches long.

1896:

The removal of the state patients from the Brattleboro Retreat will leave the institution free to devote itself to the care of private patients. In this direction the work of the future will lie.

1896:

The first collection of mail in the new Sunday service was made last Sunday and was successful. D.E. Tasker made the collection, which was the first Sunday collection ever made in Brattleboro.

1896:

The night lunch wagon has again changed hands. It is now run by Michael Lillis.

1896:

Electric car No. 3 was derailed for an hour at the Pine street concern Wednesday night. An insufficient amount of oil on the track was the cause.

1896:

A portion of the Royal Wood farm in the south part of town has been laid out into building lots which have been put in charge of S. W. Edgett & Co. for sale. Several new streets have also been laid out and will be given names at the proper time.

1903:

A movement is on foot to organize a union among the Brattleboro clerks, not to affect their salaries, but to protect their interests along other lines.

1903:

An unusual record with an incubator was made this week by George Benson of Canal street, who hatched 92 brown leghorn chicks from 106 eggs.

Latest image

Dogs Out For A Drive

Welcome to iBrattleboro!

Welcome to iBrattleboro!
It's a local news source by and for the people of Brattleboro, Vermont, published continually. You can get involved in this experiment in citizen journalism by submitting meeting results, news, events, stories, reviews, how-to's, recipes, places to go, things to do, or anything else important to Brattleboro. Or, just drop by to see what others have contributed.

Find iBrattleboro on:

 Twitter YouTube

Authentically Local

Search the Archives

Ye Olde iBrattleboro Archive

Use the pulldown to choose desired number of results.

 

Search the first decade
of iBrattleboro archives
at Archive-It.org
Feb 20, 2003 to Feb 6, 2013

Latest Stories


Next WBA Meeting Scheduled for Thursday May 14

The next monthly meeting of the West Brattleboro Association (WBA) will be held at the New England House
on Thursday, May 14th at 6:00 PM. After a review of the treasury the group will finalize details for their successful annual Chicken Barbecue, this year on Saturday, May 23rd. They will also discuss having a joint mixer in July with the Brattleboro Chamber of Commerce again this year.

In addition, the WBA will tackle organization issues such as next steps toward making the group officially non-profit, along with capacity issues.  (Having enough people to take on all the tasks!)

»

What's Going On At The Old Spic & Span?

There’s been a lot of activity at this building (Across from the Firehouse). Last week saw a huge delivery of building materials. Last fall, they put on a new roof. Today they seem to be taking it off again. Are they planning a second floor?  The guys there say it's going to be an arts center of some sort.

»

Ugh (Loud Motorcycles)

With the return warm weather and open windows, painfully loud motorcycles are also back, and seem to be worse than ever. Living downtown, I'm used to my apartment filling with noise from the logging trucks and ambulances that frequently pass by, but the level of nuisance from some of the motorcycles lately is at another level. Last Monday, one was so loud it left a trail of car alarms going off in its wake.

»

Sanders Welcomes Court Ruling on NSA - Calls for Congress to Strengthen Privacy Protections

WASHINGTON, May 7 – Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) today welcomed a federal appeals court ruling that the National Security Agency does not have the legal authority to collect and store data on all U.S. telephone calls.

“Clearly we must do everything we can to protect our country from the serious potential of another terrorist attack, but we can and must do so in a way that also protects the constitutional rights of the American people and maintains our free society,” Sanders said. “We can do that without living in an Orwellian world where the government and private corporations know every telephone call that we make, every website we visit, everyplace we go.”

»

Mother's Day Brunch in Guilford

Broad Brook Grange will present its 19th annual Mother’s Day Brunch on Sunday, May 10, from 7:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Grange hall in Guilford Center.  The proceeds from the event will allow for continued renovations of the historic building.

The all-you-can-eat brunch features eggs and omelets, any style, made to order.  Also on the menu are  pancakes, French toast, sausage, bacon and home fries, with Guilford maple syrup.  Other treats include home-baked coffee cakes and other baked goods, fresh fruit salad, and bread for toasting.  A selection of juices  will be available, along with coffee, teas and milk.

»

John Gorka at Next Stage on Saturday, May 9

Next Stage Arts Project and Twilight Music present contemporary folk singer/songwriter John Gorka at Next Stage on Saturday, May 9 at 7:30 pm.

John Gorka is perhaps the quintessential iconic singer/songwriter of the 1980’s folk scene. Hailing from New Jersey, he honed his craft and persona as a shy, wry and insightful singer/songwriter in the Greenwich Village “Fast Folk” and Boston music scenes. Gorka got his start at Godfrey Daniels, a neighborhood coffeehouse in eastern Pennsylvania which is one of the oldest and most venerable music institutions in the country.

»

Just Don’t Do It, Sanders Urges Obama on Nike Trip

WASHINGTON, May 7 – Citing Nike’s low wages for foreign workers, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) yesterday asked President Obama to cancel a planned meeting on Friday with executives of the athletic shoe maker at its headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon.

Nike has taken advantage of free-trade agreements – similar to proposed new pact which Obama is touting – to offshore tens of thousands of American jobs to Vietnam and other low-wage countries.

“Nike epitomizes why disastrous unfettered free-trade policies during the past four decades have failed American workers, eroded our manufacturing base and increased income and wealth inequality in this country,” Sanders wrote in a letter he sent to the president yesterday.

»

"Hey Jew!"

Everyone there had a nickname. His was “Radio.”

“Why is he called “Radio” I asked another prisoner.

"Because he keeps talking, non-stop, all crazy stuff." 

Radio did seem to be dispensing a steady stream of gibberish. But something about him conveyed intelligence to me. I sat down opposite Radio at one of the tables (which are immovably attached to the floor, as are the benches). The individual cells were on one side. There was a wall of bars on the other and I guess behind those bars was the “free” side. Occasionally a guard would walk by.  

»

Missing Dog!! West Brattleboro

We came home to an open front door and a missing dog. Black female, older so lots of gray. Lab mix about 40lbs. Her name is daisy. beige collar with daisies. Call me 251.7468. :(

»

Sanders Files Bill to Break Up Big Banks

WASHINGTON, May 6 – Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) today introduced legislation to break up the nation’s biggest banks in order to safeguard the economy and prevent another costly taxpayer bailout. Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) proposed a companion bill in the House.

“No single financial institution should have holdings so extensive that its failure could send the world economy into crisis,” Sanders said. “If an institution is too big to fail, it is too big to exist.”

The biggest banks in the United States are now 80 percent bigger than they were one year before the financial crisis in 2008 when the Federal Reserve provided $16 trillion in near zero-interest loans and Congress approved a $700 billion taxpayer bailout.

»

Lawrence Auclair Gathering

There will be a gathering in memory of Lawrence Auclair at Mocha Joe's on Saturday May 9th at noon. Please come join us. 

thank you 

Robyn Flatley

»

On Exhibit at Brooks Library in May

ON EXHIBIT for the Month of May at Brooks Library

MAIN FLOOR: RAYE ARNAULT Close-up photographs presenting a unique perspective on things in the natural world.

2ND FLOOR CHILDREN: AMY HUNTINGTON Children's book llustrator of "Grandma Drove the Garbage Truck".

»

First Wednesday at Brooks Library: The Duel: Aaron Burr vs. Alexander Hamilton

Join us for First Wednesday on 6 May 2015, 7 pm - 9 pm for The Duel: Aaron Burr vs. Alexander Hamilton. Was it murder or suicide when the vice president of the United States killed the first secretary of the treasury in a duel? Willard Sterne Randall, award-winning biographer of Hamilton and five other Founding Fathers, tells this fascinating story.

Location Library Main Room. For more information contact Brooks Library by phone at 802-254-5290 ext 0, by email at info@brookslibraryvt.org, or on the web at brookslibraryvt.org. Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main Street, Brattleboro, VT 05301. The event is free and open to the public. 

»

Selectboard Meeting Notes: New Brattleboro Zoning Districts

Brattleboro’s new, proposed district boundaries were presented and discussed at the regular meeting of the Selectboard. The presentation was an introduction to new land use regulations the town hopes to adopt later this year.  It is a big, important change for the town, and the board was sad that no one was there to report on it, or even attend. No one!

Also at the meeting, Selectboard goals were approved, distillers will be featured at a Heifer’s event in June, police officers were sworn in to new positions, the ADA Committee is restructured, and more.

Read on for more. And don’t tell the Selectboard! They don’t seem to know we do this.

»

Nellie Bly

Nellie Bly (May 5, 1864[1] – January 27, 1922) was the pen name of American journalist Elizabeth Cochrane Seaman.[2] She was also a writer, industrialist, inventor, and a charity worker who was widely known for her record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, in emulation of Jules Verne's fictional character Phileas Fogg, and an exposé in which she faked insanity to study a mental institution from within.[3] She was a pioneer in her field, and launched a new kind of investigative journalism.[4]

»

A Presidential Candidate - Mike Huckabee

Mike Huckabee has announced his intention to become president.

"I am a candidate for president of the USA," and, "I never thought of using a firearm to murder someone."

»

Brattleboro Fire Department - Melchen Road Press Release

Date of Incident: May 4, 2015
Location of Incident: Near 493 Melchen Rd

Nature of Call: Brush Fire

Time Reported: 12:54 pm
Time Under Control: 5:29 pm

Number of Alarms and Times Upgraded:
1st alarm @ 1:06 pm;
2nd alarm @ 1:10pm;
3rd alarm @ 1:18 pm

»

Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas at Next Stage on Thursday, May 7

Next Stage Arts Project and Twilight Music present an evening of cutting edge fiddle and cello explorations of Scottish, Celtic and global music by Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas at Next Stage on Thursday, May 7 at 7:30 pm. With a shared passion for improvising on the melody and the groove of traditional tunes, Alasdair and Natalie feature dazzling teamwork, swapping melodic and harmonic lines and trading driving rhythmic riffs.

»

Rooting For Baltimore

The news out of Baltimore on last Monday afternoon hit me with an eerie feeling of familiarity.  My family had moved to Baltimore in January of 1968.  Just four months later, in April (coincidentally) of that year, the city erupted in riots following the assassination of Martin Luther King.  I was only seven and barely understood what was going on, but I’ve never forgotten that time.  We were home from school for a week while the National Guard rode down our street in big convoy trucks with guns facing out.  My uncle took us up on the roof one night to see the fires that dotted the skyline to our south.  Everyone was very freaked out.

Hearing then that a “mob” of “thugs” was making its way through the city toward downtown, touching many of the places that were hit so hard in ‘68, brought those years back again. It wasn’t a settling feeling.  In the late ‘60s in places like Baltimore, there were adults who truly feared revolution.  They thought that maybe the center wouldn’t hold. They were inordinately fearful of what they perceived as chaos, and certainly the events of that year were chaotic.  I remember hearing my father saying to someone, “if they get to 25th Street, we’re going to have to leave.”    Monday afternoon brought back that scary feeling of chaos to a lot of people old enough to remember.

»

iBrattleboro Poll

Who is responsible for my decision to try something dangerous or deadly?

Choices